Our Universe is our Classroom | Dr. Mike Reynolds | TEDxFSCJ

In this inspiring and charming talk, Dr. Mike Reynolds brings us into his world, full of stars, planets, and asteroids, and big enough, exciting enough, and beautiful enough for a lifetime of wonder and lessons. Dr. Mike Reynolds has been gazing at the stars since he was seven years old, even creating his own backyard observatory. Reynolds is perhaps best known for his astronomy and science education efforts, from the classroom to informal education to astronomy and space exploration outreach. Reynolds has 37 years in astronomy and space sciences in the gamut of a high school and university instructor, planetarium and museum director, researcher, writer, and lecturer. He was director of the Chabot Science Center in California from 1991 to 2002, and currently Director Emeritus.

Dr. Reynolds has written several astronomy books and writes and serves as a corresponding editor for Astronomy (magazine). In addition to leading expeditions worldwide, Dr. Reynolds is also an invited speaker, engaging audiences in things astronomical, as well as doing book signings as often requested at many of his talks. More recently, Dr. Reynolds has served as the Dean of Natural Science and Mathematics and Professor of Astronomy at Florida State College at Jacksonville. Dr. Reynolds’ astronomical research has been primarily focused on Solar System objects, as well as meteoritics. He has led expeditions around the world for numerous total solar eclipses, meteorite crater research, and meteorite recoveries. He worked with Meade Instruments in 2005 to develop and create Meade’s MeteoriteKit, a special set of meteorites, tektites, and impactites.

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TED Ed Lesson created by  Dr. Jose G. Lepervanche using video from TEDx Talks YouTube channel.

Discussion: If the universe is our classroom, what lessons from outer space can be used to improve our own planet?

TED Ed Lesson link: https://ed.ted.com/on/gsCaeoXW


TEDxFSCJ Salon: Rediscovering Space | #OutdoorsClassrooms

2017 TEDxFSCJ Salon

For millennia, people looked to the stars as a source of awe and inspiration. Today, new ventures between private industry and government agencies like NASA have reignited our sense of wonder, prompting many to ask not only when humans will finally reach Mars, but what careers and businesses are experiencing the greatest growth and how ordinary people and science professionals can get involved.

Join TEDxFSCJ as we partner with the Museum of Science & History, Jacksonville (MOSH) in hosting a salon focused on how Florida and the First Coast are accelerating the pace of space exploration. The evening’s speakers will include NASA – National Aeronautics and Space Administration engineer Kathleen O’Brady, Lockheed Martin engineerChelsea Partridge, Professor of Astronomy Mike ReynoldsMade In Space CEO Andrew Rush, and host Jenn Ruliffson, a student at theUniversity of North Florida. At the close of the evening, attendees will have the opportunity to look through telescopes positioned atop the museum roof—courtesy of JAX #popscope: Public Astronomy Nights, the local affiliate of #popscope, an urban movement of astronomers who host free, “pop-up” events across North America.

The salon will be held Thursday, December 7, at the MOSH Planetarium, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Kathleen O’Brady
Kathleen is Lead Certification System Engineer for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program in which she oversees the certification of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner, a spacecraft for transporting crew to and from the International Space Station. Kathleen graduated with a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and a master’s degree in physics from the University of Central Florida. Kathleen considers herself fortunate to have supported the space shuttle program from 2004 until its retirement in 2011.

Chelsea Partridge
Chelsea is an engineer for Lockheed Martin Space Systems at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, where she conducts environmental control and life support systems testing on the agency’s Orion spacecraft. Chelsea graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of North Florida where she conceptualized CubeSat applications for bone density research. A lifelong advocate for space exploration and science education, Chelsea advises gifted students at The Weiss School, who are currently building a CubeSat of their own.

Mike Reynolds
Mike is a Professor of Astronomy and Physics at Florida State College at Jacksonville and the Executive Director Emeritus of the Chabot Space & Science Center in Oakland, California. His 40-year career runs the gamut from high school and university instructor to planetarium and museum director, researcher, and college administrator. Mike is the recipient of several awards, including the 1986 Florida State Teacher of the Year, NASA Teacher-in- Space National Finalist, and the G. Bruce Blair Medal in Astronomy.

Andrew Rush
Andrew is President and CEO of Silicon Valley-based Made In Space, Inc., the first manufacturing company in space. Serving first as general legal counsel during MIS’s startup phase and then as CEO since 2015, Andrew envisions a robust interplanetary existence for humanity that unites life and work in space. Andrew holds a B.S. in physics from the University of North Florida and a J.D. from Stetson University, and he currently serves on the Physics Advisory Group at UNF.

Jenn Ruliffson
Jenn is a student research assistant at the University of North Florida. Jenn’s excitement in learning about new missions in space exploration has been such a constant for years that she recently quit her full-time job to go back to school and study atmospheric chemistry at UNF. As a member of NASA’s Solar System Ambassadors Program, Jenn has hosted several events relating to space and space exploration, and she hopes to pursue research at NASA in the future.

The most Martian place on Earth | Armando Azua-Bustos | TED2017

How can you study Mars without a spaceship? Head to the most Martian place on Earth — the Atacama Desert in Chile. Astrobiologist Armando Azua-Bustos grew up in this vast, arid landscape and now studies the rare life forms that have adapted to survive there, some in areas with no reported rainfall for the past 400 years. Explore the possibility of finding life elsewhere in the universe without leaving the planet with this quick, funny talk.

Watch also animated video about a “Drone-based Medical Delivery System” after his talk.


Time-lapse video of an aurora above Canada | International Space Station